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ITSP - 2017 update

CY 2017 Update to the Commonwealth Strategic Plan for Information Technology for 2017 - 2022

Executive Summary

The CY 2017 Update to the Commonwealth Strategic Plan for Information Technology for 2017 - 2022 reflects the evolution of the commonwealth business and technology environments since the publication of the previous version and presents a vision for the coming 2 – 5 years that addresses the major Information technology opportunities and challenges facing the commonwealth and agencies. It documents current and planned activities implementing the vision and identifies how these activities support the Governor’s Priorities and the 2016 Commonwealth Technology Business Plan’s Initiatives. In addition, the plan provides guidance to decision makers and establishes the current basis for the scoring, ranking and evaluation process to ensure alignment of proposed IT investments to the commonwealth vision. The scoring, ranking and evaluation process determines whether the commonwealth CIO approves or disapproves the IT investments.

The plan’s vision for the coming 2 to 5 years is shaped by economic conditions, the rapidly evolving technology environment, particularly in the area of digital services, agency demands for new and expanded IT services, and moving the IT infrastructure toward a multisource platform. Key elements of the vision include providing agile, world-class technology solutions, with an emphasis on digital services, delivering value through a disciplined approach to the management of technology across the enterprise of state government, increasing overall productivity of agencies and their employees, meeting the Governor’s directive to increase the use of shared data and analytics among agencies, and protecting government systems and citizen information from unauthorized access.

Based on the initiatives stated in the Technology Business Plan and an analysis of updated technology environmental factors, the plan identifies seven emerging technology trends that are playing, or likely to play, a significant role in agency efforts to employ technology to address the initiatives. For each technology trend, the plan presents actionable steps which agencies can take to harness the trend to address their business needs as well as the initiatives and vision goals. The majority of the steps focus on six commonwealth IT priorities noted by the commonwealth CIO. Those priorities include moving to cloud application hosting, meeting demand for increased Internet access and bandwidth, and providing secure wireless access as a utility within state office buildings.

While the plan identifies goals and actionable steps for the coming five years, activities currently planned or under way provide ample evidence that the commonwealth is addressing the Technology Business Plan initiatives and commonwealth IT priorities. This includes the 2016 Recommended Technology Investment Projects (RTIP) report, which documents a clear move toward cloud or remote hosting solutions; January 2017 data from 49 agency IT strategic plans where 45% report that the IT infrastructure transition will impact their agency, 65% project an increase in Internet usage, and 57% are investigating cloud solutions; and the report requested in Executive Directive 7, which contains recommendations on data sharing and data management.

To assist agencies assessing the applicability of the actionable steps to their application environment, new to this edition of the plan are two appendices that identify software that is at or nearing its lifecycle end, thus requires some type of intervention or remediation.

In conclusion, this 2017 Update to the Commonwealth Strategic Plan for Information Technology for 2017 – 2022 provides guidance and a framework for the commonwealth and agencies to take full advantage of what the Technology Business Plan refers to as a “confluence of opportunities for technology” to implement a bolder vision of technology as the enabler of far-reaching business solutions that benefit all constituents.

Introduction

Welcome to the CY 2017 update to the Commonwealth of Virginia Strategic Plan for Information Technology for 2017 through 2022. This update is the product of input from the CIO Council, Customer Advisory Council, a workgroup of agency technology representatives, and information technology (IT) subject matter experts. In addition, information from the April 2016 update to the Commonwealth Technology Business Plan was reviewed and, where appropriate, referenced in this update.

This six year rolling plan and its updates are maintained as a website. A navigation panel on the right of the screen appears on each web page of the plan and provides navigation to each element of the plan.

Summary of CY 2017 Updates to the Plan

The previous edition of the plan was originally built around the following set of technology trends: Social Media, Mobility, Cybersecurity, Enterprise Information Architecture, Enterprise Shared Services, Cloud Computing Services, and Consolidation/Optimization. A discussion of the continued relevance of these trends was the starting point for updating the plan, along with the CIO’s directive that the Commonwealth continue to adapt to, and take advantage of, technology change. Click here to view the Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA) Strategic Plan, which implements the CIO’s directive through delivery of agile technology services at the speed of business.

The following table summarizes changes to the trend titles. It is followed by a brief explanation of changes to the trends. The trends are now listed in order of significance to the Commonwealth and their interdependencies.

Updated Technology Trend titleRelationship to original trendPrimary reason for change
IT Infrastructure Services Program Formerly named Consolidation/Optimization Shift from single to multi-vendor service
Shared Data and Analytics New trend; previously addressed as part of the Enterprise Information Architecture trend Significant increase in agency data sharing and use of analytics, as reflected in Executive Directive 7
Information Security and Risk Management Formerly named Cybersecurity Reflects expanded scope of activities and current terminology
Enterprise Information Architecture and Data Governance Formerly named Enterprise Information Architecture Highlight the importance of data governance which has become more prominent due to agency Cloud computing demands
Cloud Computing Services No change to the trend title  
Digital Government / Internet of Things (IoT) Formerly named Mobility Broaden to include all digital government elements, including the Internet of Things
Enterprise Services Formerly named Enterprise Shared Services Drop “Shared” as redundant word

As the table shows,

  • IT Infrastructure Services Program (ITISP) was given the number one priority. It is also a major component of VITA’s Strategic Plan (see above link).

  • Shared Data and Analytics, previously addressed as part of the Enterprise Information Architecture trend, was added to the list and given the number two priority due to the current demand as demonstrated by Executive Directive 7.

  • The title of the Cybersecurity trend was changed to Information Security and Risk Management to reflect terminology that has broader meaning in the information technology industry.

  • The title of the Enterprise Information Architecture trend was expanded to Enterprise Information Architecture and Data Governance to highlight the importance of data governance.

  • The title of the Mobility trend was expanded to encompass all digital government elements and to highlight the emergence of the Internet of Things.

  • The title of Enterprise Shared Services was shortened to Enterprise Services by dropping the redundant term “shared”.

Social Media was a technology trend in the third edition of the plan. Since then, more than sixty-five percent of all agencies across the Commonwealth have established a social media presence on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter (Virginia.gov, 20161). While Facebook and Instagram are social media sites with the first and second most active users respectively (statista.com, 20162), agencies across the Commonwealth have also elected to represent themselves via YouTube, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and other media. Additionally, Virginia.gov launched a website redesign on July 1, 2016 that now provides social media links (if they exist) to various agencies.

For these reasons, agencies’ presence on social media has become so pervasive across the Commonwealth that social media should no longer be considered as a new-wave technology trend. Rather, Commonwealth agencies now instinctively realize the effectiveness of leveraging social media to improve transparency in government, increase collaboration, and encourage communication among the state workforce and citizenry. Ultimately, social media capability leads the charge to improve citizen access to critical information that agencies frequently update and provide.

The four actionable steps associated with the Social Media trend were addressed as follows for this update.

  • The creation of a social media policy and standards may be considered with other policies and standards as part of the Digital Government / Internet of Things trend.

  • Resources have not been and are not expected to be available to establish a Commonwealth Center of Excellence for social media.

  • The Commonwealth of Virginia has established a broad presence on social media through individual agency accounts.

  • Establishing a social media environment for state employees is not viewed as a necessary endeavor at this time. Instead, the Commonwealth’s approach has been to focus on the use of collaboration tools.

Finally, new to this edition are two appendices relating to software that is at or near the end of its lifecycle, and thus requires some type of intervention or remediation. The appendices are not intended to be an all-inclusive software list, rather an enterprise level list that can serve as the basis for an agency assessment of its software portfolio when planning for software upgrades or replacements. The appendices consist of two tables: key applications already at risk or that will be soon and key operating and database management systems already at risk or that will be soon.

Technology and the Business of State Government

The numerous technology advances in recent years have left Commonwealth agencies and citizens alike awash in technology choices. The challenge for both groups is to select technology that helps them achieve their business or personal objectives. For the Commonwealth, the fundamental principle that investments in technology are made to support the Commonwealth’s business priorities remains as central to the CY 2017 Update to the Commonwealth of Virginia Strategic Plan for Information Technology for 2017 - 2022 as it was to the preceding editions and the Commonwealth Technology Business Plan. Briefly stated, information technology is a means, not an end in itself.

The sections that follow will trace the development of technology guidance from the Commonwealth’s long-term goals, through the state government business environment and the broader technology environment, to an updated set of technology trends and actionable steps for agencies to consider when planning their technology investments.

Business Environment and Commonwealth Technology Business Plan

In September 2011 the Council on Virginia’s Future completed a collaborative effort with Cabinet secretaries to arrange the secretaries’ designated business priorities according to the Council’s seven long-term goals with the publication of the Commonwealth of Virginia Enterprise Strategic Priorities-Agency Strategic Planning Version.

Also in 2011, the Information Technology Advisory Council (ITAC) was tasked by the General Assembly to work in consultation with the Council on Virginia’s Future to develop a technology business plan. ITAC began by identifying four significant business environmental factors that affected development of the business plan and substantially impact how the plan would be carried out. Shaped by these factors and the Commonwealth of Virginia Enterprise Strategic Priorities, the Council developed the Commonwealth Technology Business Plan by determining the Commonwealth’s high-level business priorities and identifying the key initiatives that could become technology focal points in support of those business priorities.

In April 2016, the Customer Advisory Council (CAC) updated the plan. The factors identified in the original plan remain relevant, but have been updated. They are described in the “Environmental Factors” page of this plan. The plan’s original five initiatives were updated and two new initiatives, 6 and 7, added, as shown below. Note that Initiative 6 speaks to “IT security”, which is a component of the broader Technology Trend “Information Security and Risk Management”. The updated Commonwealth Technology Business Plan was approved by the Customer Advisory Council (CAC).

  • Initiative 1 - Emphasize programs and tools that enable all citizens to interact with government safely and securely, and when, how, and where they want to interact.

  • Initiative 2 - Improve information-sharing and governance to derive quality information from data already collected.

  • Initiative 3 - Leverage technology to improve worker productivity and make state employment more attractive to the current and future workforce.

  • Initiative 4 - Support educational attainment initiatives—key to achieving state economic development and quality of life goals.

  • Initiative 5 - Expand technology platforms and productivity tools that support Virginia’s goal of remaining the best managed state.

  • Initiative 6 - Support initiatives that will make Virginia the leader in IT security and risk management.

  • Initiative 7 - Expand and support enterprise and collaborative IT services.

The Commonwealth Technology Business Plan and the seven initiatives therein continue to provide a logical link to, and a business-based platform for, the CY 2017 Update to the Commonwealth of Virginia Strategic Plan for Information Technology for 2017 - 2022.

Technology Environment, Trends, and Strategic Directions

Just as the Commonwealth Technology Business Plan began with consideration of significant environmental factors, so this CY 2017 update begins with identification of technology environmental factors. Based on discussions with Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA) and executive branch agency IT leaders, along with ITAC and Customer Advisory Council members, two separate streams emerged for consideration: broad technology environmental factors and specific emerging technology trends. The technology environment factors, described in the “Environmental Factors” section of this document, are the increasing pace of technology expansion and change, the “consumerization” of technology, and the emergence of the internet of things. This plan considers these three factors likely to have influence on the evolution of the technology trends noted in the plan.

The discussions identified seven emerging technology trends that are playing, or likely to play, a role in agency efforts to address the seven Commonwealth Technology Business Plan initiatives. The updated technology trends, along with a parenthetical short identifier used elsewhere in this plan, are listed below in order of significance to the Commonwealth.

  • IT Infrastructure Services Program (ITISP)

  • Shared Data and Analytics (SDA)

  • Information Security and Risk Management (ISRM)

  • Enterprise Information Architecture and Data Governance (EIADG)

  • Cloud Computing Services (CCS)

  • Digital Government / Internet of Things (DG)

  • Enterprise Services (ES)

For each trend, the plan states a Commonwealth goal for leveraging the trend and identifies several actionable steps, i.e., specific activities that agencies can use to harness the trend to fulfill the initiatives. Each technology trend is detailed in a separate page. The subsections on each technology trend page contain a description of the trend and the role it can play in fulfilling the initiatives, actionable steps for agency consideration, current examples of agency use of the technology trend, and resource links for further information. The description subsection includes a brief explanation of the technology, key business drivers for considering the technology, how the technology supports achieving the seven Commonwealth Technology Business Plan initiatives, and the challenges to incorporating the technology into the Commonwealth or agency technology portfolio.

The plan recommends 33 actionable steps, activities that the commonwealth and agencies can pursue to leverage the technology trends to address their business needs and the Commonwealth Technology Business Plan initiatives. Reflecting the rapid changes in technology noted above, 19 of the steps (57.6%) are new or revised for this update. The actionable steps associated with each technology trend are listed under the third tab of each technology trend page and are summarized in the following table.

Actionable Steps for Each Technology Trend
Technology TrendNumberPercentage
IT Infrastructure Services Program 6 18.2
Shared Data and Analytics 7 21.1
Information Security and Risk Management 5 15.2
Digital Government / Internet of Things 5 15.2
Enterprise Information Architecture and Data Governance 3 9.1
Cloud Computing Services 3 9.1
Enterprise Services 4 12.1

The plan also identifies the actionable steps that support each of the Commonwealth Technology Business Plan initiatives. The page entitled Actionable Steps Supporting Commonwealth Technology Business Plan Initiatives lists the actionable steps associated with each initiative. Over 80 percent of the actionable steps support more than one initiative.

The Commonwealth CIO has identified six Commonwealth IT Priorities that address the key elements of the vision outlined in the Executive Summary. These priorities are:

  • Move to cloud application hosting
    Cloud Computing Services is one of the Technology Trends highlighted in the plan. The trend reflects the agency shift to cloud or remote hosting services. In support of this shift, VITA has established the Enterprise Cloud Oversight Service (ECOS) to provide governance, oversight functions and management of cloud based services.

  • Provide secure wireless access as a utility within state office buildings for employees and the public
    Working with the Department of General Services, establish a digital environment in current and new state office buildings that incorporates secure wireless access as a utility for state employees and the public.

  • Meet demand for increased Internet access and bandwidth
    The Technology Trend sections document the increasing use of technology to address agency business needs and meet citizen demands for improved services. A common requirement of these technologies is internet access and network bandwidth. As a result, forecasts indicate an increased demand for internet based services across the spectrum, for constituents as well as COV employees.

  • Support delivering critical digital services to agencies and constituents
    Through VITA and contracted technology and IT service providers, the commonwealth provides a wide variety of digital services to agencies and constituents that support and enhance the delivery of services. Examples range from provision of agency email and web services to citizen online access to government data and the transaction of routine business.

  • Achieve a successful IT infrastructure transition
    The transition of the IT infrastructure to a multi-supplier integrated services platform is a key objective of the IT Infrastructure Services Program, detailed in the first Technology Trend in this plan.

  • Implement shared security services
    Information security and risk management is one of the Technology Trends highlighted in the plan. To assist agencies in identifying and managing their security needs, Commonwealth Security and Risk Management has initiated several services, such as Centralized Information Security Officer, Centralized IT Security Audit, and the Security Incident Management.

The table below summarizes how the 33 actionable steps support achievement of the six priorities.

Actionable Steps Supporting the Commonwealth IT Priorities
Commonwealth IT PriorityNumberPercentage
Move to cloud application hosting 22 66.7
Provide secure wireless access as a utility within state office buildings for employees and the public 4 12.1
Meet demand for increased Internet access and bandwidth 7 21.2
Support delivering critical digital services to agencies and constituents 31 94.0
Achieve a successful IT infrastructure transition 8 24.2
Implement shared security services 13 39.4

The Commonwealth IT Priorities are inter-related. For example, delivering critical digital services to agencies and constituents requires meeting the resulting demand for increased Internet access and bandwidth. Decisions on investments addressing these priorities will need to factor in the inter-relationships.

The following diagram demonstrates how all the IT strategic planning elements described in the preceding paragraphs are related.

ITSP elements diagram

Links

Footnotes

1 Global social media ranking 2016 | Statistic. (2016, April 1). Retrieved July 07, 2016, from http://www.statista.com/statistics/272014/global-social-networks-ranked-by-number-of-users/

2 Commonwealth of Virginia. (2016, July 1). Retrieved July 07, 2016, from www.virginia.gov

Environmental Factors

The environmental considerations information that follows is an excerpt from the April 2016 update to the Commonwealth Technology Business Plan.

Environmental Considerations

Any planning effort logically begins with consideration of those significant environmental factors which affect the plan’s development and will substantially impact how the plan is actually carried out. In the context of this Technology Business Plan, six such “external realities” have been identified and are outlined below.

Financial Outlook
The global financial outlook that was characterized by turmoil when this plan was initially presented in 2011 has been replaced with modest, but uneven, economic and job growth. At the end of FY14, the Commonwealth experienced a budget shortfall. While this shortfall was mainly the result of changes in federal tax policy, the main concern was automatic federal budget cuts (sequestration), which continue to reverberate through the state economy. As a result, the state adopted a conservative approach to the FY15 budget, and ended the fiscal year with a record surplus. In addition, with the economy strengthening, the state took action to maximize opportunities presented by a 2-year reprieve from sequestration. In FY 16, the economic picture changed yet again. While budget expectations for employment growth in 2016 were accurate, that trend was not reflected in wages and tax revenue, which grew, but at a slower rate than anticipated. Fiscal 2016 revenue growth resembled that typically seen in more difficult economic times. FY 2016 ended with a $279 million budget shortfall.

On August 26, 2016, Governor McAuliffe addressed the Joint Money Committees of the General Assembly, announcing

"the revised Interim forecast reduces revenue from that contained in the currently enacted Appropriation Act by $564.4 million dollars in fiscal year 2017, as growth falls from 3.2 percent in the official forecast to 1.7 percent.

The Interim forecast also projects total revenue growth of 3.6 percent in fiscal year 2018 compared with 3.9 percent in the official forecast, a reduction of $632.7 million dollars.

In total, the Interim forecast reduces the official revenue estimate projected in the current Appropriation Act by $1.2 billion dollars over the biennium."

While the near-term budget shortfall represents a challenge for agencies, other long term factors still present opportunities. These include the continued shift in employment from the federal to the private sector, and the state investment in education and training to meet the increasing demand for high skilled, and high paying, workers.

Continued Population Growth
In terms of its population, Virginia continues to be one of the fastest growing states in the nation. The state’s 2010 Census count of 8,001,024 was almost one million greater than in 2000, a 13% increase (as compared to the overall US increase of 9.7%). In turn, the state’s 2015 count was 8,382,993, a 4.8% increase. The long-term trend for significant state population growth is expected to continue, with the population projected to increase by about 5% by 2020 and by another 9% by 2030. It should also be noted that the population growth is not distributed equally across the state. The population in rural areas is declining while increasing in urban areas.

Population growth inevitably adds to demands for public services. To meet these demands in a responsive, cost effective manner will likely require new or expanded technologies. For example, technology can be employed to deliver remote services to rural areas where the population cannot support dedicated service professionals. In turn, this requires that the Commonwealth’s communications infrastructure, such high speed internet be installed with the capacity to support the remote provision of services.

Diversity of Virginia’s Population
In addition to growing, as noted above, Virginia’s population is becoming more demographically and geographically diverse. Figures from the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service show that slightly less than half of the population growth from 2010 to 2014 came from migration into the state, increasing the diversity of the state’s population. The figures also show there is increasing diversity between the state’s urban and rural populations, with younger citizens moving from rural to urban centers, leaving an older population in the rural areas.

Over the next 20 years, as the “Baby Boomer” population cohort reaches retirement age, the increasing percentage of older Virginians will further add to online service requirements. This cohort is more technology savvy than prior seniors, and their use of technology at home is significant. This will contribute to the demand for high speed internet access throughout the state.

Aging of the State Government Workforce
As a corollary to the aging of Virginia’s population in general, the state government workforce is also on average getting older. Data from the Department of Human Resource Management (DHRM) yield the following telling statistics:

  • The average age of a state worker has increased 10.4% in last 20 years.

  • State workers’ average years of service has increased 17.6% in last 20 years.

When an experienced state worker retires or otherwise leaves state employment, more than just manpower is often lost. All too frequently substantial institutional knowledge and in-depth understanding of long-standing systems and processes leaves as well. Technology can play a key role in capturing such institutional knowledge and in-depth understanding.

Attractiveness of Government Careers to Younger Generations
DHRM statistics indicate that the number of full-time-equivalent (FTE) state positions has decreased by eight percent over the past three years. That decrease, coupled with the above-noted exodus of knowledge and experience, puts even greater emphasis on the need to bring qualified younger workers into the state workforce.

However, trends also show increasing difficulties in attracting younger workers to public service. “Gen-X” (ages 30-45) and “Millennials” (under 30) have distinctly different workplace goals than the Boomers. Millennials in particular are looking for challenges (knowledge work, not rote tasks), flexibility in and outside of the workplace, collaboration (and lots of cool technology to support that), and (potentially good news for government) a chance to make a difference by solving real problems.

Virginia state government faces similar issues in attracting and keeping younger workers. DHRM data indicates that the highest turnover rate among state employees occurs in the first five years of service, when 53% of all separations occur. The data show that Millennials, which comprise about 20% of the state workforce, are resigning at about twice the rate as prior generations.

Pervasiveness of Technology
As noted in the previous edition of this plan, “the introduction of new technologies is now a common feature of today's marketplace, and it is widely accepted that the overall pace of technology change has increased over the past decade.” This in turn has created a proliferation of technologies which impacts both government and citizens. The pervasiveness of technology brings both opportunities and challenges to state government, for example:

  • State employees and organizations are leveraging tools that originated in the consumer market to communicate, collaborate, and share knowledge both in the workplace and with citizens.

  • Proliferation of social media has created expectations of instant information and given government greater opportunity for transparency.

  • As technology has spread through citizen’s day to day lives, government is increasingly in possession of more sensitive data that needs to be protected.

  • The “internet of things” represents the addition to the internet of smart devices, such as sensors, security cameras, and automobiles. The following comment from the previous edition of this plan remains pertinent, “The availability of such ubiquitous data sources has the potential to "disrupt" many aspects of state government information technology use. At a minimum, all such devices implemented by state government will need to be secured, managed, and supported.”

Next Steps

The publication of the previous edition of the Commonwealth of Virginia Strategic Plan for Information Technology for 2012 through 2018 established the framework for three follow-up activities, which are listed below with 2016 updates. In addition, one very important next step has been added.

Publicize the plan.

Through presentations and workshops, publicize the emergence and use of the technology trends and promote consideration of the recommended actionable steps.

2016 Update: The plan was extensively publicized through announcements, presentations, and training sessions. The plan also was integrated into the agency IT strategic plan update process.

Conduct agency capability survey.

Survey agencies to assess the importance of the technology trends and actionable steps to their business strategies and their current and desired capability to use the technology trends and implement the actionable steps.

2016 Update: An agency capability survey was not conducted. Instead, VITA staff discussed the technology trends and actionable steps in relation to specific agency proposed IT strategic plan entries, projects, or procurements.

Develop an implementation plan.

Build on the results of the Capability Survey to develop a prioritized plan for implementing the actionable steps deemed most important to the Commonwealth and agency business strategies.

2016 Update: A Commonwealth prioritized plan for implementation was not developed. The focus was on assisting agencies with prioritization of their individual projects or procurements.

Prepare for the impact of the IT Infrastructure Services Program.

Although all seven technology trends are important, the IT Infrastructure Services Program trend is seen as the most significant because it affects all business and information technology operations and has a strict deadline. Therefore, planning and communication for the IT Infrastructure Services Program must continue to be a top priority. In addition, it is important to establish benchmarks for and determine the impact of the IT Infrastructure Services Program. Refer to the IT Infrastructure Services Program trend page for the proposed timeline.

Technology Trend: Shared Data & Analytics (SDA)

Commonwealth Goal

Expand the use of shared data and analytics among Virginia agencies to improve the provision of services and outcomes, maximize the use of resources, increase the return on investment of citizens’ tax dollars, and promote citizen access to open data.

Why This Trend

A 2012 survey by Commonwealth Data Governance found that a majority (84%) of the respondents said their agency actively exchanges data with other entities and over three quarters (80%) had integrated shared data into their performance/outcome measurement systems.

On May 23, 2016 Governor McAuliffe signed Executive Directive 7 “to leverage the use of shared data and data analytics among state agencies.”

Both NASCIO and Gartner rank data sharing and use of analytics among their top 10 trends for 2016.

The use of shared data and analytics broadens perspectives and helps agencies gain new insights on programs.

Overview

Since the publication of the third edition of this strategic plan, there has been a significant increase in interest in providing citizen access to Commonwealth data, sharing of data between agencies, and using analytics to identify and address agency business issues. The launch of the Commonwealth open data portal “DataVA” (https://data.virginia.gov/), issuance of Executive Directive 7 “Leveraging the Use of Shared Data and Analytics,” and the inclusion of open data and analytics on both NASCIO and Gartner top 10 trends for 2016 confirm the importance of this technology trend and merit its inclusion in this edition as a separate trend.

This trend encompasses the following components:

  • Big data, typically defined as data sets that are so large or complex that traditional data processing applications are inadequate (this includes both structured and unstructured agency data).

  • Open data, defined on the DataVA site as “all non-sensitive, public information that is made freely available for public use in an easily readable format”

  • Data analytics, defined by Gartner as “the collection and analysis of data in order to provide the insight that can guide actions to increase organizational efficiency or program effectiveness”

 

As noted on the DataVA site,

“Open data empowers the public to unlock the value of the data. Citizens can develop mobile applications and other tools to use the information in ways which can translate into economic opportunity. The era of Big Data and Data Analytics has ushered in an exciting wave of new tools and businesses centered on providing meaningful analysis from the endless waves of new data. The Commonwealth can use these analyses to increase ROI of programs and services and improve citizen outcomes by being more data driven and evidenced based in policy and decision making.”

On May 23, 2016, Governor McAuliffe issued Executive Directive 7 Leveraging the Use of Shared Data and Analytics. The directive states that “Commonwealth data collection and analysis activities shall focus on enhancing government transparency, streamlining business processes, increasing operational efficiency and effectiveness, and minimizing duplication and overlap of current and future systems development.” The order directs “the Secretaries of Technology and Finance and the Commonwealth’s Chief Information Officer (CIO) to review all Commonwealth systems, practices, processes, policies, applicable laws and regulations governing the sharing of data across agencies and create an inventory of state agencies’ data analytics assets, capabilities, best practices, and data sharing activities.” They are to report their findings no later than October 15, 2016.

Key Business Drivers

Commonwealth agencies must work across lines of business and share information with partners at multiple levels of governance to deliver the services required by citizens. However, such information-sharing and business partnerships are hindered by disparate data definitions, specifications and terminology. At the organizational level, such partnerships are also impacted by cultural and institutional barriers, such as agency or system “silos.” Without standardized data and shared data definitions and specifications, supported by collaboration between agencies and their business partners, the Commonwealth lacks the information sharing capacity needed for meeting business performance outcomes and effective delivery of services.

Commonwealth agencies spend millions of dollars each year to collect, manage and use data on persons and other entities. Agencies frequently collect the same data from the same persons as other agencies, storing these data in agency or system-centric data “silos.” Such data redundancy presents an unnecessary cost, negatively impacts the value of government’s data assets, and hinders meeting citizen service demands.

Support for Technology Business Plan Initiatives

  • Initiative 1 - Citizen access
    Updated websites and databases that use data analytics will provide citizens with a clearer picture of how the Commonwealth adapts to change.

  • Initiative 2 - Information sharing
    Shared data and analytics provide agencies with a means to develop meaningful, unifying, and quality information with data collected across the Commonwealth.

  • Initiative 3 - Workforce productivity
    Shared data and analytics will allow state workers to organize data more efficiently, which saves time and produces information of value to the Commonwealth.

  • Initiative 4 - Support for education
    Shared data and analytics will allow for educators to leverage dynamic information to support educational attainment initiatives.

  • Initiative 5 - Expansion of technology platforms/tools
    With the increase over time of shared data and analytics, it is important for the Commonwealth to expand technology platforms and tools to keep pace with the demand for needed information.

  • Initiative 6 - IT and cyber security
    As shared data and analytics become more popular among Commonwealth agencies, information security protocols must keep pace to address the rising amount and classification of shared data.

  • Initiative 7 - Enterprise and collaborative services
    Enterprise and collaborative services derive their collaboration methodologies and overall effectiveness from the information and economies of scale that shared data and analytics offers to service providers.

Challenges

While the case for increased data sharing and use of analytics is compelling, agencies also face complex implementation challenges, ranging from legal and legislative restrictions to privacy concerns and funding. Sharing of data with citizens and between agencies may be constrained by state legislation, federal regulations, records management and security policy and procedures, and Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requirements.

Establishing data ownership and maintaining the accuracy of data will require new procedures and formal sharing agreements. The potential impact on data security must also be addressed.

Governance of shared data within an agency and the governance needed for collaboration among agencies is another challenge due to the different cultures, values, and agendas of the agencies. If different organization models are selected in the future, this will have an impact on what data can be shared. Governance will have to address how to control the way that agencies use each other’s data, how they keep the shared data secure, and how they destroy records. This is an important element to address in the Enterprise Architecture and Governance trend.

Security and protection of privacy are major factors that must also be addressed. Executive Directive 7 states, “But just as important as improving the flow of information among government agencies is the respect that state agencies must show for individuals’ privacy interests. State government shall continue to protect individual privacy, adhere to applicable state and federal regulations, and cybersecurity best practices during any activity involving the collection of sensitive information.”

Supporting open data, data sharing, and analytic research requires investments in consultants, infrastructure, tools, and staff training. These will have to be incorporated into already tight agency budgets.

Actionable Steps

  • SDA.A - Identify and modify Code of Virginia language that prohibits sharing of data between agencies.

  • SDA.B - Promote the COV open data portal “data.virginia.gov” and continue to grow the number of open datasets on the website.

  • SDA.C - Develop an enterprise approach to using “big data” and analytical tools that

    • Identifies commonwealth, agency, and partner business needs that can be efficiently and effectively addressed by applying innovative forms of IT and analysis to appropriate enterprise data.

    • Defines and implements applications incorporating the necessary advanced IT and analytical capabilities.

  • SDA.D - Implement information sharing policies, standards, and guidelines (PSGs) and a data sharing framework for acceptable use of publishing public datasets.

  • SDA.E - Establish a trust agreement framework, defined by PSGs, to support Commonwealth-wide information exchange across domains and levels of government.

  • SDA.F - Develop an enterprise approach to data management to enable the effective governance of information assets aligned with industry trends, including big data, business analytics, and emerging toolsets.

  • SDA.G - Support the integration of emerging workforce skills needs and course learning objectives databases statewide to better match educational opportunities to occupational titles.

Agency Examples

VA Department of Transportation (VDOT) - IT Asset Management System to Use Data Sharing

The Information Technology Division requires an IT Asset Management (ITAM) System to track and manage the assignment, transfer, renewal, and disposal of all VDOT IT assets (hardware, software, desktop printers, etc.). The system will include an inventory of all hardware equipment and software licenses. Supporting technology requirements include the LANDesk (LD) COTS package for Asset Lifecycle Management (ALM) and Data Analytics for Managed Intelligence (DA-MI). LANDesk Management Suite (LDMS) is the tool used by VITA/NG for ITAM. The use of LD products by VDOT will enable the sharing of discovery data from agents on NG-leased assets for hardware inventory and software compliance management. Through this data sharing, VDOT avoids the cost of purchasing the LDMS core and deploying redundant agents on 7,000 leased assets. Essentially, this agency example describes how VDOT saves money for the agency by reducing costs through data sharing and data analytics.

Virginia Department of Health (VDH) - Community Health Portal Plan

VDH intends to build a Community Health Portal with studies, community health reports, health research information, and health-related data for all Virginia citizens. This will provide a web interface that allows users to search and filter among hundreds and thousands of datasets. It will also offer some simple data visualizations and data analytics. Users can preview the data using tabular and graphic previews as well as customized map displays. Each dataset links to its own metadata page that provides a narrative description, source information, clickable tabs, data restrictions, and data stewardship information. The data visualizations and data analytics tools planned to be in place at the Department of Health will be valuable to the agency itself, the agency’s workforce, and Virginia citizens. VDH has planned to create detailed presentations of health-related information on its web portal, which ultimately will provide citizens with ease of access to critical health information. The web portal, which will use shared data, will save the agency and its customers’ time because it will provide answers to important questions. Although the Community Health Portal is in the design stage, the idea and value of leveraging shared data and analytics is highlighted in this agency example.

VA Department of Human Resource Management (DHRM) - Statewide Data Software Sharing

In 2015, DHRM implemented statewide data software for real-time understanding of workforce activity, critical trends, and predictive modeling. The project is 80% complete, and an expected 100% rollout to agencies is planned for completion by December 2016.

Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) - Innovative Use of Big Data and Analytics - OneSource Data Warehouse

In August 2013, DBHDS began a mission-critical initiative to implement a data warehouse, OneSource, to store data and produce analyses from a wide number of operational systems. As part of this project, DBHDS has developed a governance board to oversee the data ecosystem and align the data assets with the strategic direction of the agency. It also has created an analytical data warehouse that encompasses all individual touch points, normalized data, and business logic in one organization-wide, easily accessible source. In addition, the agency has implemented self-service business intelligence and reporting solutions for end users. This new, integrated system houses information about all aspects of patient care, and has enabled the agency to ensure a higher quality of life for the individuals it supports. OneSource serves as the system of record for statistical and pattern analysis, internal management reporting, and external reporting.

VA Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) - Use of Analytics on Agency Website

ABC plans to update the agency’s website to assist with statistics that show customer usage and interaction with the website using a tool such as Google Analytics. The ideal solution will be a searchable product catalog integrated with ABC’s existing Store Locator application. Additionally, the ideal solution will be searchable, dynamic, and user-friendly and provide easy information access. This will allow the user to search for products and see if a product is available in a certain store or in a store within a nearby radius.

VA Department of Education

The Virginia Longitudinal Data System (VLDS) is a pioneering collaboration of state agencies, giving the Commonwealth an unprecedented and cost-effective mechanism for extracting, shaping, and analyzing partner agency data in an environment that ensures the highest levels of privacy. VLDS comprises several component technologies that support secure, authorized research addressing Virginia’s top policy and state program questions.

VLDS is the result of a shared effort by several Virginia government agencies. VLDS participating state agencies include the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE), the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV), the Virginia Employment Commission (VEC), the Virginia Community College System (VCCS), the Virginia Department of Social Services (VDSS), the Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (VDARS), and the Virginia Department of Health Professions (VDHP). http://www.doe.virginia.gov/info_management/longitudinal_data_system/index.shtml

Resources

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe’s Executive Directive 7 (ED7)

Issued to inform agencies of the importance of implementing shared data and analytics across the Commonwealth. Visit the link for the full, two-page directive.
http://digitool1.lva.lib.va.us:1801/webclient/DeliveryManager?pid=1325723&custom_att_2=direct

Governor’s Open Data Portal

http://data.virginia.gov/

Health Information Technology Standards Advisory Committee

Health Information Technology Standards Advisory Committee (HITSAC)

Identity Management Standards Advisory Council

The IMSAC focuses efforts on modifying the workability of datasets containing personal information to ensure healthcare operations in the Commonwealth are more efficient. IMSAC advises the Secretary of Technology on the adoption of identity management standards and supporting guidance documents.
Identity Management Standards Advisory Council (IMSAC)

NASCIO

NASCIO provides state CIOs with a top ten list of information technology “Priority Strategies, Management Processes and Solutions.” Data analytics comes in at number four on the 2016 list, which was finalized in early November 2015. Visit the pdf link for the complete list.
http://www.nascio.org
IMSAC Overview

National Information Exchange Model (NIEM) Core Person Data Elements

www.niem.gov

Technology Trend: IT Infrastructure Services Program (ITISP)

Commonwealth Goal

Transform the infrastructure services delivery model to a multi-supplier integrated services platform to provide adaptive, best-in-class services and market-based commercial value, and to enhance governance participation and performance management. Include agencies in the governance of this model.

Why This Trend

Managed IT services are necessarily an integration of various technologies and service processes that often include multiple responsible, accountable, and impacted stakeholders. Coincident to the upcoming expiration of the Comprehensive Infrastructure Services Agreement (CIA) with Northrop Grumman, the Commonwealth will extend upon enterprise achievements and incorporate agency objectives by transitioning in waves to an integrated multi-supplier model with professionalized services integration to allow for initiation, stabilization, and extension beginning with all services currently in the scope of the CIA. As appropriate, other technology trends such as cloud computing may become part of this integrated services platform.

The IT Infrastructure Services Program is the most significant of the trends because it provides the infrastructure upon which the other trends are built.

The multi-supplier model also encourages competition and results in cost savings.

Overview

VITA has developed and is executing a second-generation sourcing strategy in anticipation of the June 30, 2019 expiration of the Comprehensive Infrastructure Agreement (CIA) with Northrop Grumman. In 2006, a long-term contract with Northrop Grumman was signed, known as the IT Infrastructure Partnership. The Commonwealth's needs have changed since then, and marketplace capabilities have evolved. VITA must prepare, seek input, consider options, and develop recommendations to ensure continuity and reliability of IT infrastructure services leading up to and through that date. Following extensive discussions with stakeholders and analysis and recommendations from Integris Applied, VITA has started the process of implementing a competitively sourced multi-supplier model with services integration and a transformation in governance to ensure that VITA’s organization and enhanced agency participation are outcomes of striking a different balance between more agency-focused requirements while retaining what was largely achieved in initial, enterprise priorities.

Agency and enterprise goals have been set for the future services delivery platform. Goals for agencies focus on service delivery quality, ease of doing business, service flexibility, and agency choice. In turn, goals for the enterprise focus on the maintenance of cost competitiveness, management control, the flexibility to evolve, support for VITA oversight functions, standardization across the enterprise, security, Commonwealth procurements, and transition.

Following are the guiding principles for this effort:

  • Transition all services from the Northrop Grumman (NG) contract by June 2019 (term).

  • Manage implementation, operational, and transitional risk.

  • Conduct multiple waves of procurements to mitigate operational and implementation risk.

  • Include agencies in request for proposal (RFP) development and evaluation.

  • Determine final solutions and integration points via RFP processes – not all decisions must be made now.

  • Maintain financial balance of service towers to create flexibility for the Commonwealth.

  • Create competition within service towers whenever possible.

  • Create buying ability for at-will customers whenever possible.

A major component of the transition will be a series of competitive procurements, conducted and implemented in waves.

Key Business Drivers

The Commonwealth initially pursued consolidation and established the Comprehensive Infrastructure Agreement in response to several business drivers, including the need to modernize and integrate the Commonwealth IT infrastructure, gain control and stabilize IT spending, and improve services and employee productivity. The major business driver at this point is the June 30, 2019 expiration of that agreement with Northrop Grumman. As noted under the Technology Environmental Factors section in this plan, rapid and significant change in the technology landscape is now the norm. This complicates and expands the preparation and execution of the transition.

While the original objectives of Virginia’s IT program focused on technology capital investments, standardization, and consolidation, in the time since signing the Northrop Grumman contract, agency and enterprise needs have shifted, leading VITA to look beyond technology to search for improved ways to engage with the agencies. As documented in the Integris Applied report, delivery issues facing agencies are also important business drivers for a new approach. The report summarized these issues as follows:

  • Empathy for agency business operations
    Agencies do not believe the Partnership understands or appreciates the impact service delays, disruptions, or unplanned changes have on their business operations.

  • Existence of operational silos
    Agencies experience poor communication between the various VITA and Northrop Grumman internal organizational silos.

  • Cost
    Agencies perceive that Partnership services are much more expensive than what can be purchased in the market. Agencies are frustrated with a lack of control and transparency around cost, forcing many to reduce other services to compensate for perceived increasing charges from VITA.

To address these concerns, the Customer Advisory Council recommended a workgroup be established to provide a dedicated focus for the development of an agency interaction model to expand agency involvement and help meet business objectives through the IT decision-making process. Based on recommendations from the workgroup, in August 2016 the CIO approved the Commonwealth IT Management and Governance Charter. As stated in the charter, the commonwealth IT infrastructure management and governance (CIIMG) is a service governance structure adapted from the recommendations made in the VITA IT infrastructure sourcing strategy. The CIIMG framework establishes a new agency-centric engagement model designed to balance enterprise and agency priorities. Agencies and service providers will be engaged at all levels of the infrastructure service governance structure ensuring transparency and accountability. The engagement model is illustrated below.

CIIMG engagement model

Support for Technology Business Plan Initiatives

  • Initiative 1 - Citizen access
    Fully managed enterprise infrastructure and services expands the technology options available to agencies for communicating with citizens.

  • Initiative 2 - Information sharing
    Fully managed enterprise infrastructure and services promotes cost-effective sharing of information among agencies.

  • Initiative 3 - Workforce productivity
    Providing an up-to-date enterprise technology and information infrastructure supports improved productivity and helps attract and retain younger workers.

  • Initiative 4 - Support for education
    A fully managed service environment provides a cost-effective way to expand applications and services that support educational attainment initiatives.

  • Initiative 5 - Expansion of technology platforms/tools
    Consolidation and optimization will streamline operations by supporting enterprise-wide collaboration and standardization, while constraining IT operations cost.

  • Initiative 6 - IT and cyber security
    A competitively sourced multi-supplier model with services integration will require creative and robust information security solutions.

  • Initiative 7 - Enterprise and collaborative services
    VITA will work with agencies to provide a successful transition from the CIA contract, and enterprise and collaborative services will prove to be important tools to use to simplify the transition to the multi-supplier model.

Challenges

In a briefing to agency heads on June 13, 2016, the Commonwealth chief information officer (CIO) noted the challenges associated with the IT sourcing procurement.

Agency Involvement: IT infrastructure sourcing will improve services, but will require dedicated time from agency staff. Agency involvement is needed for planning and RFP teams, supplier governance and testing, and modification of agency applications. Timeframes for agency participation are listed below. However, the level and extent of effort from agency staff is dependent upon the outcome of RFPs.

  • Wave 3 RFP teams (2017-18)

  • Testing of agency-owned applications (2016-2019)

  • Vendor governance (ongoing, starting in 2016)

Agency staff members who are already participating have a significant time commitment.

  • Steering committee (8 agency representatives)

  • Extended core team (3 agency representatives)

  • Wave 1 RFP teams (19 agency representatives)

  • Wave 2 RFP teams (23+ agency representatives)

  • Customer Advisory Council (15 agency representatives)

  • Agency Interaction Model (AIM) workgroup (6 agency representatives)

Rates: FY17 rates are final, but future rates are unknown. Rates should reflect market prices, but transition costs exist. The transition team will work with the Department of Planning and Budget to keep costs predictable and level.

Actionable Steps

  • ITISP.A - Build multi-supplier model, including a services integrator.

  • ITISP.B - Work with Customer Advisory Council (CAC) to enhance agency involvement in future services delivery platform.

  • ITISP.C - Determine agency and VITA organizational adjustments to support new service delivery model.

  • ITISP.D - Conduct three waves of competitive procurements.

  • ITISP.E - VITA, in conjunction with agencies, will prepare and lead all tasks needed to implement the IT Infrastructure Services Program.

  • ITISP.F - Work with the Customer Advisory Council to implement the approved Commonwealth IT Infrastructure Management and Governance (CIIMG) charter.

Resources

Virginia’s Commonwealth Information Officer (CIO) recently briefed the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission (JLARC) and agency heads. The CIO presented information on the “Infrastructure Services Sourcing Update.”

Technology Trend: Digital Government / Internet of Things (DG)

Commonwealth Goal

Develop a comprehensive strategy and foundation for the evolution to digital government that leverages the ubiquitous availability of mobile devices and “apps,” supports data sharing, and incorporates the internet of things (IoT) to enhance and expand citizen services, ensure governance and security compliance, gain greater agency productivity within agencies, and increase the attractiveness of Commonwealth employment to younger workers.

Why This Trend

By 2016, use of mobile apps will surpass that of internet domain names, making mobile apps the dominant means of engaging with brands.1

Global mobile data traffic will reach the following milestones within the next five years:

  • Monthly global mobile data traffic will be 30.6 exabytes.

  • The total number of smartphones (including phablets) will be nearly 50 percent of global devices and connections.

  • Because of increased usage on smartphones, smartphones will cross four-fifths of mobile data traffic.2

Eighty-seven percent of millennials always have their smartphone at their side, day and night; 78% of millennials spend over two hours a day using their smartphones.3

Gartner forecasts 25 billion installed things by 2020, suggesting that internet of things deployments will become a daunting array of components, ubiquitous connectivity, and embedded intelligence.1

1 Gartner, Inc.; 2 Cisco Systems, Inc.; 3CMOcouncil.org

Overview

The previous edition of the strategic plan documented the rapid proliferation of mobile devices as a new communications platform. One consequence was the dramatic change in the way citizens and agency employees could access information and services. This 2017 update finds mobility and associated access has now become pervasive, with continued expectations on agencies for additional access to information and services through a variety of mobile platforms and applications.

Adding to these expectations is the emergence of a new form of interaction, the internet of things (IoT). Gartner defines the IoT as follows:

“…the architecture of dedicated physical objects (things) that contain embedded technology to sense or interact with their internal state or external environment. The IoT is not restricted to the internet and can be experienced through any medium that supports communication between the thing and its associated applications. The IoT architecture operates in an ecosystem that includes things, communication, applications and data analysis.”

The rapidly increasing adoption of IoT technologies offers new opportunities for insight and problem-solving, while producing an unprecedented volume, velocity, and variety of data, and raising significant organization, security, and privacy challenges.

Key Business Drivers

The continued expectation for access and the emergence of the IoT, as well as other trends such as data sharing and analytics and the need to modernize the workforce to attract and retain young workers, is generating a broad rethinking of agency data and IT strategy, which this plan terms “digital government.” At the strategic level, digital government encompasses interactions between a citizen and their government, between governments and their employees, and between governments, and asks the question “How can data, traditional IT, and emerging technologies be best deployed to cost effectively deliver information and services?”

Several factors are driving agencies to consider how best to respond to the widespread use of internet-connected devices. Increasing citizen comfort with using internet-connected devices for personal communication is reflected in their expectations for similar communication and interaction with Commonwealth agencies. Agencies are now expected to provide information 24x7 and, increasingly, deliver real-time, context-specific (i.e., location, time-of-day) services. Increased network speeds now make web browsing and application use on internet-connected devices more practical and efficient. In response, agencies are adapting their websites to operate internet-connected devices and are developing specialized apps to deliver information and services. This is particularly significant for rural users with limited or no access to broadband internet service.

For agency operations, factors driving consideration of internet-connected devices include the need for more employees to be connected while outside agency offices, addressing the Commonwealth commitment to balancing work and home life, and the desire to attract younger workers. Further, the increasing power of internet-connected devices combined with reductions in their cost and the cost of the associated data plans are altering the cost-benefit consideration.

Support for Technology Business Plan Initiatives

  • Initiative 1 - Citizen access
    Citizens now expect to interact with agencies from any of their internet-connected devices.

  • Initiative 2 - Information sharing
    Mobile devices provide a means to effectively and efficiently share the right information at the right time.

  • Initiative 3 - Workforce productivity
    Appropriately implementing a “bring your own device” (BYOD) strategy can help agencies attract and retain younger workers.

  • Initiative 4 - Support for education
    Tablets are becoming an important tool for supporting educational initiatives.

  • Initiative 5 - Expansion of technology platforms/tools
    Equipping certain employees with mobile devices can lead to improved worker productivity.

  • Initiative 6 - IT and cyber security
    BYOD Enterprise Handheld Services exposes Commonwealth data across mobile cyberspace, so will require continued vigilance to further protect users from mobile security threats.

  • Initiative 7 - Enterprise and collaborative services
    Many devices are connected via the internet of things, so this will prompt agencies to present meaningful real-time data to the public from a variety of diverse data collection sources such as traffic cameras and weather balloons.

Challenges

While the availability of internet-connected devices presents agencies with several opportunities to improve employee productivity and communication with citizens, acting on those opportunities requires agencies to address several business and technical issues. Forecasts indicate an increased demand for internet based services across the spectrum. The demand will manifest in areas of citizen engagement and COV staff use. Investments in meeting the demand in these areas will need to be prioritized accordingly.

Successfully capitalizing on internet-connected device opportunities involves time and resources to develop a mobile device strategy that aligns with the agency priorities and objectives. Because incorporating internet-connected devices will likely necessitate changes in critical business procedures, employee participation and senior management leadership are essential.

Increasing costs are likely to be a factor as agencies expand their use of and support for internet-connected devices. Agencies will need to determine what devices to offer and who will be allowed to use them. They will also need a strategy for keeping the equipment current.

Technical issues include connectivity and how to address the needs of diverse users (i.e., employees, customers and partners) with different device and app requirements. Other technical issues include meeting somewhat contradictory user expectations for a richer information environment accessed through a simpler apps interface, maintaining apps across a range of internet-connected device platforms, and reengineering current websites and applications to operate effectively in the mobile device environment. As agencies evolve their use of internet-connected technologies, they, along with the Commonwealth, will be forced to add new layers of network protection and increase their security capabilities.

Actionable Steps

  • DG.A - Develop and implement policies and technologies to enable a mobile environment that is both attractive to next-generation workers and cost effective and productive for the Commonwealth.

  • DG.B - Establish a standard for mobile apps development (including a security component) and a list of targeted applications.

  • DG.C - Establish a forum for early adopters to share plans and experiences with collecting and processing internet of things (IoT) data.

  • DG.D - Ensure agency involvement in processes to periodically assess new and emerging technologies.

  • DG.E - Increase investment in internet bandwidth to meet forecasted growth in internet based services.

Agency Examples

Department of Conservation and Recreation - Virginia State Parks Guide

state parks guide logo

The Approved Virginia State Parks guide app enables people to decide which park to visit using a comprehensive list of specific park activities or to search for a park within a region. Photos are provided for popular hiking and biking trails for most state parks. Users can take advantage of GPS and GIS mapping technology to track trails, mark waypoints, and locate landmarks.

Virginia Department of Transportation - “VDOT 511,” A Mobile Application

VDOT 511 logoVDOT’s 511 mobile app enables people to check for incidents, construction work, and road conditions on their planned routes of travel. In addition, they can view traffic camera feeds and check travel times to beaches and other popular Virginia destinations. Users can stay connected by viewing VDOT’s recent Twitter messages on the 511 app. VDOT reminds users to not use this app while driving! Distracted driving while using cell phones is a major cause of crashes.

Virginia Employment Commission - “VAWorks,” A Mobile Application

VAWC logoThe Virginia Employment Commission offers a mobile app designed to help job seekers find work. VAWorks users can view any job posted to the web directly on their phones. Users can select and map the latest job openings in their area from nearly 16,000 websites and can search by keyword and location. The apps also allows people to share their favorite jobs via email, Facebook or Twitter.

Bring Your Own Device – Enterprise Handheld Services

To improve productivity, collaboration, and efficiency among Commonwealth employees, the Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA) is offering a new service that permits state employees to access work information from personal mobile devices such as smartphones. This service enables state employees to securely access work email accounts, calendars, contacts, and tasks from personal smart devices such as iPhones, iPads, Droids, Windows mobile devices, and more. To support employee use, agencies may provide stipends. To obtain this service, an agency must be on the Commonwealth infrastructure and have completed messaging transformation.

For further information, see VITA FS - Bring Your Own Device

DMV Mobile

DMV Mobile allows citizens to access their MyDMV account while “on the go” to perform over 20 transactions including vehicle registration renewal, driver license renewal, address change, and more. The Virginia DMV app enables citizens to locate the nearest Customer Service Center, check wait times, take sample licensing exams, and select, customize, and purchase special license plates.

For further information, contact Pam Goheen, Assistant Commissioner for Communications, Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles

eVA 4 Business and eVA Mobile 4 Approvers

The Department of General Services has published two apps for users of eVA, Virginia's innovative e-Procurement system. The eVA 4 Business app provides real-time access to business opportunities with Commonwealth of Virginia state agencies, universities, colleges, local governments and other Virginia public bodies. The eVA Mobile 4 Approvers app affords eVA approvers an easy way to review and approve requisitions.

For further information, contact Marion Lancaster, Information Technology Manager, Department of General Services

Department of Corrections Virginia - CORIS

With the completion of a major initiative to upgrade all legacy systems to a .NET environment that can support the use of mobile apps, the Department of Corrections (DOC) will be piloting the use of tablets and apps to address high-priority business needs. The initial effort focuses on supporting probation officers and offers mobile access to the Department’s Correctional Information System (VirginiaCORIS). DOC is working closely with VITA to incorporate the appropriate security environment.

For further information, contact Rick Davis, Chief Information Officer, Department of Corrections

Resources

Virginia.Gov Mobile Apps Directory

The Commonwealth’s official website, Virginia.gov, contains a directory of agency mobile apps. Each entry contains the publishing agency, brief description, and links to the Google Play and Apple IPhone app stores. The directory can be found at: http://www.virginia.gov/connect/mobile-apps-directory

Enterprise Architecture Standard (EA 225)

Section 5.6, ETA Platform Domain – Mobile Communications Use, defines the mobile communication use requirements that enable state employees to use their personal mobile communications devices to access Commonwealth voice and email systems to conduct official state business. The standard is available at: Enterprise Architecture Standard - EA225-15

NASCIO State Mobile Apps Catalog

The National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) has developed a new State Mobile Apps Catalog, a collection of over 160 state and territory native mobile apps. According to NASCIO, “This tool offers a convenient way to see what other states are producing in terms of mobile apps, and allowing states to generate ideas for their own state or territory.” The catalog can be found at: http://www.nascio.org/apps/

Technology Trend: Enterprise Information Architecture & Data Governance (EIADG)

Commonwealth Goal

Implement enterprise information architecture and data governance that promotes availability of consistent, secure, high-quality, timely, and accessible information to enhance public value and enable quality service to the citizens and workforce of the Commonwealth.

Why This Trend

According to the results of the August 2012 Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA) Scorecard survey on the “current state” of EIA across the Commonwealth, more than 70% of respondents said they agreed or strongly agreed that their agency engaged in EIA activities.

Over 50 data stewards attended the first Commonwealth Data Stewards Group kickoff meeting in February, 2014.

A Commonwealth of Virginia Enterprise Information Architecture strategy was developed over an eight-month period by 120 data stewards, business leads, and technical staff representing over 30 agencies.

Overview

In July 2012, the Secretary of Technology adopted into Enterprise Architecture (EA) Policy 200-02, a more robust definition of enterprise information architecture (EIA) that promotes availability of consistent, secure, high-quality, timely, and accessible information to enhance public value and enable quality service to citizens of the Commonwealth. The EIA definition and strategy resides within the broader Enterprise Architecture (EA) framework, which is a strategic asset used to manage and align the Commonwealth’s business processes and IT infrastructure and solutions with the state’s IT strategy.

The Commonwealth EIA Strategy represents the next step toward a mature EIA approach and a formal statement of Virginia’s vision for maximizing its information assets. The strategy has been developed to align to this plan and respond to key business drivers.

The strategy identifies four program areas and establishes goals for each.

  • Data Governance: Forge a disciplined approach to data governance across the Commonwealth with formal roles for data stewards and other stakeholders.

  • Data Standards: Promote the use of standardized data and shared data definitions as a means of supporting information exchange across agency systems, government domains, and levels of governance.

  • Data Asset Management: Manage information as an enterprise asset, with an emphasis on quality, security, efficiency, accessibility, reduced redundancy, and a higher return on investment.

  • Data Sharing: Leverage the sharing of information based on business need and in compliance with governing laws, statutes, and regulations to increase government performance, improve service to citizens, and more effectively achieve business outcomes. This is addressed in the Shared Data and Analytics technology trend.

In August 2012, the Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA) implemented the EIA Scorecard, a survey instrument designed to assess the current state of EIA across executive branch agencies based on a set of business and technical performance measures. Using the results of the initial survey and EA best practices, VITA staff drafted the EIA strategy with input from agency data stewards and other stakeholders. A series of three stakeholder engagement sessions, held from February through April 2013, were attended by 120 participants representing over 30 agencies. The participants refined the draft and ensured it addressed agency business needs. The draft was adopted by the Secretary of Technology in August 2013.

Key Business Drivers

The Commonwealth EIA Strategy has been designed in response to four key business drivers impacting the state’s information management activities:

  • Data quality

  • Standardized data and shared definitions

  • Data accessibility, reuse, and reduced redundancy

  • Informed decision making and public service

The National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) has referred to information as the “currency” of state government (NASCIO 2011, Capitals in the Clouds). Data may be considered “high quality” if they present an accurate and reliable reflection of the “real world” entities they describe. High-quality data is crucial for delivering effective citizen services. Accordingly, ensuring data quality continues to be a primary objective for the Commonwealth’s information management initiatives.

The public and governmental leaders expect accurate, timely, and reliable data to make informed decisions. This requires transparency and engagement between agencies and their stakeholders. Demand for collaborative, informed decision making cuts across branches and levels of government, with the emphasis on getting the right information into the right hands at the right time for public service.

Support for Technology Business Plan Initiatives

  • Initiative 1 - Citizen access
    Implementing the EIA Strategy is the basis for delivering high-quality data to citizens.

  • Initiative 2 - Information sharing
    The EIA Strategy targets removal of barriers to data sharing.

  • Initiative 3 - Workforce productivity
    Younger workers, educated in an information-rich environment, expect to have the right information at the right time.

  • Initiative 4 - Support for education
    High-quality data are essential for tracking educational attainment initiatives.

  • Initiative 5 - Expansion of technology platforms/tools
    Reducing data redundancy improves agency productivity.

  • Initiative 6 - IT and cyber security
    High-quality data should not be at risk for interception or hacking. Information security is essential to maintain data integrity and accessibility within EIA.

  • Initiative 7 - Enterprise and collaborative services
    Enterprise and collaborative services need access to critical information at opportune times to efficiently and effectively work together.

Challenges

The results of the August 2012 EIA Scorecard point to key challenges the Commonwealth faces in achieving the goal for this technology trend, including the following:

  • Agency data are currently maintained in “silos.” While most agencies have implemented data standards, the majority of these tend to be internal standards rather than Commonwealth or external standards.

  • There is no inventory or registry of enterprise data assets.

  • The governance of enterprise data is currently informal, mostly at the agency level.

The goals and objectives identified in the EIA Strategy represent the required steps and milestones for addressing these challenges and achieving an enterprise, Commonwealth-wide approach to information management through the 2020 planning horizon of the EIA strategy and this plan.

Actionable Steps

  • EIADG.A - Maintain and refine an enterprise information architecture strategy.

  • EIADG.B - Adopt and implement information exchange standards to provide a common basis for governmental information sharing.

  • EIADG.C - Continue to define the roles and responsibilities of the Commonwealth of Virginia data stewards and the governance stewardship body.

Agency Examples

Virginia Information Technologies Agency’s Process Model for Data Standardization

From August-November 2012, the Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA) engaged with the Department of Accounts (DOA) and the Cardinal project team to implement the new process model for development of the Chart of Accounts Data Standard. The adopted standard, which received final approval by the Secretary of Technology on January 24, 2013, leveraged DOA’s expertise with regard to financial accounting and control and the State Comptroller’s statutory authority to “direct the development of a modern, effective, and uniform system of bookkeeping and accounting” and ensure it is adopted by state agencies (§2.2-803). VITA uses the process model when responding to agency requests for assistance in developing the data standards.

Virginia Department of Health’s Use of Services Oriented Architecture (SOA)

The Virginia Department of Health (VDH) in partnership with the Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) and the Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA) has been tasked with developing and implementing a Birth Registry Interface (BRI) and Death Registry Interface (DRI) in support of the Medicaid Information Technology Architecture (MITA) Care Management business process. The objective is to increase the efficiency of government employees who provide assisted services by use of the technology supporting the self-directed service model. Service-oriented architecture (SOA) is the core technical concept of the MITA Technical Architecture. The interface projects will facilitate access to Care Management Services via the Commonwealth of Virginia (COV) Gateway Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and COV Health Information Exchange (HIE). This project will use a “publish and subscribe” model. This is a method used to synchronize activities around an event like a birth or a death. A source system at the Vital Records office will publish a document for a discrete “event” to the SOA technology. The SOA technology in turn, will distribute the event document to the subscribers. This model allows agency and multi-agency business processes to be coordinated by the technology. For example, a birth notification document can be published by Vital Records and the subscribing agency (for example, Department of Social Services) can take action for enrollment, if applicable, based on business rules.

Resources

Enterprise Architecture (EA) Policy 200

The Commonwealth’s Enterprise Architecture is a strategic asset used to manage and align the Commonwealth’s business processes and information technology infrastructure/solutions with the state’s overall strategy. The Enterprise Architecture Policy establishes the governance framework for the implementation of the enterprise architecture. The policy can be found at: Enterprise Architecture Policy - EA200

EIA Scorecard

In August 2012, VITA implemented the EIA Scorecard – a survey instrument based on Gartner’s IT Score for EA methodology – to assess the current state of EIA across executive branch agencies and to identify strategies for moving the Commonwealth toward its desired future state in the EIA Maturity Model. For a full set of summary tables for the EIA Scorecard results, visit EIA Scorecard

Commonwealth Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA) Strategy: 2014-2020

In 2012-2013, Commonwealth Data Governance completed an eight-month planning process to develop an enterprise information architecture strategy. The strategy was adopted by the Secretary of Technology in August 2013. The strategy is available at: Commonwealth EIA Strategy

Enterprise Data Standards Repository

All adopted Commonwealth Data Standards are located in the Enterprise Data Standards Repository at COV Adopted Standards

Data.Virginia.Gov

Data.Virginia.gov is an online portal that provides easy access to Virginia’s open data and keeps Virginians informed of major Commonwealth initiatives that use big data. The key objectives of this site are to increase transparency, encourage innovation, and enhance state operations. Further information can be found at: http://data.virginia.gov/

National Information Exchange Model (NIEM) Core Person Data Elements

To meet the statutory requirements under Item 427 of the 2012 Appropriation Act, which requires the standardization of “all citizen-centric” data, the Commonwealth has adopted the NIEM Core Person data elements as a Commonwealth ITRM Standard. For general information on NIEM, please visit http://www.niem.gov

Technology Trend: Cloud Computing Services (CCS)

Commonwealth Goal

Manage and direct the evaluation and adoption of cloud computing to address agency business requirements for a secure, flexible, economical, and rapidly scalable computing environment.

Why This Trend

Cloud computing services are attracting considerable attention by offering an alternative to the traditional acquisition of hardware, software, and support/administrative personnel.

NASCIO State CIO Priorities for 2016 cites cloud services as a priority strategy and cloud solutions software as a service as a top 10 priority technology.

The Comprehensive Infrastructure Services Agreement (CIA) with Northrop Grumman currently provides premise-based, central data center, and local data closet mainframe, server, and storage solutions for Commonwealth agencies, often deemed a private cloud.

The benefits of cloud computing services must be balanced against the technical and business requirements, such as data security and terms of use.

Overview

The National Institute for Standards and Technology Special Publication SP800-145 defines cloud computing as a model for enabling universal, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management efforts or service provider interaction. Put another way, cloud computing is a subscription-based service that provides internet access to information and computing services. A common example of cloud computing is internet email, where firms such as Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo provide all the hardware and software necessary to support an email account that can be accessed anytime and anywhere through the internet.

The national interest in cloud computing and associated services, as documented by NASCIO, is reflected in the interest of Commonwealth agencies. In May 2016, the Customer Advisory Council (CAC) submitted to the Commonwealth CIO a report titled Commonwealth of Virginia: Cloud Vision and Strategy. The report lists eight short-term recommendations to “provide select cloud-based hosting options to the agencies within six to nine months.” The report further proposes a Commonwealth cloud strategy: Cloud Plus (+).

“The commonwealth will provide a comprehensive portfolio of cloud, traditional and other hosting services, maximize IT solution cloud readiness, enable informed hosting decision-making by customers while ensuring and maintaining the appropriate security of commonwealth data.”

Following further discussion with the CAC and other stakeholders, in October 2016 VITA announced it will enable cloud consumption by agencies through the Enterprise Cloud Oversight Service. This new service will provide the governance, oversight functions and management of cloud based services, specifically Software as a Service (SaaS).

Enterprise Cloud Oversight Services (ECOS) will add value to the enterprise through the following:

  • assuring compliance and improved security by providing transparency through VITA oversight;

  • ensuring consistent performance from suppliers through service level and performance monitoring;

  • providing flexibility with growing business demands;

  • and ensuring adequate security controls are in place for the protection of data, proper utilization of resources and compliance with regulations, laws, and timely resolution of audit recommendations.

ECOS will minimize the need for exception in order to obtain external SaaS services. It will provide a flexible and custom option for obtaining SaaS services which meet the specific needs of agency. This service provides guidance and oversight activities for agencies in the following areas:

  • Meeting Commonwealth requirements, such as SEC 501 and SEC 525

  • Incorporating of the appropriate contract Terms and Conditions to mitigate risk

  • Completing Annual SSAE16 assessment reviews

  • Ensuring Vulnerability scans and intrusion detection are conducted

  • Patching

  • Ensuring Architectural standards are met

  • Monitoring Performance against Service Level Agreements (SLAs)

  • Other reporting and governance requirements which include:

    • Identification of the Data Owner/Data Steward

    • Formalizing the Data Escrow Process (e.g., return of COV data at the end of contract)

    • Identification of the Billing and Invoicing process

    • Identification of any Agency directed customization to SaaS applications

Key Business Drivers

Several business issues facing agencies are driving interest in the use of cloud computing services, including the need to do the following:

  • Quickly deploy services

  • Rapidly increase speed of service delivery and flexibility for service changes

  • Improve support for business continuity

  • Enable agency IT staff to focus on mission-critical tasks instead of traditional infrastructure maintenance and operations activities

  • Provide agency business owners more options in selecting the most appropriate and cost-effective technology solution to meet a business need

A widely perceived benefit of cloud computing is the ability to rapidly reduce infrastructure expenses. Although some organizations may see immediate cost savings, the goal of deploying cloud computing services should focus on adding business value. A 2012 National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) survey noted that 29 percent of responding CIOs indicate that cost of cloud computing services is a concern, “…indicating that there is no general acceptance that cloud services are less costly.”

Support for Technology Business Plan Initiatives

  • Initiative 1 - Citizen access
    Cloud computing services support 24/7 citizen access to agency information and services.

  • Initiative 2 - Information sharing
    Cloud computing services provide new approaches to sharing information.

  • Initiative 3 - Workforce productivity
    Younger workers, familiar with using personal cloud services, such as email and document and photo storage, will be comfortable using agency cloud computing services.

  • Initiative 4 - Support for education
    Cloud computing services, such as Blackboard, are already contributing to meeting the Commonwealth’s educational initiatives.

  • Initiative 5 - Expansion of technology platforms/tools
    Use of cloud computing services can be an element in improving employee productivity as well as enabling agencies to redistribute their human resources.

  • Initiative 6 - IT and cyber security
    Decisions will be necessary regarding the type of cloud (private, community, public, or hybrid) that provides suitable security for a specific business application.

  • Initiative 7 - Enterprise and collaborative services
    Cloud computing services can provide a convenient and large information storage area for enterprising agencies.

Challenges

While the potential benefits of using cloud computing services to enhance service delivery and business value can be substantial, there are business, technical, and security requirements that must be addressed to realize those benefits. Business requirements may include process reengineering, changes in staff responsibilities, and negotiating terms of use. Technical requirements encompass customizing software or services, credentialing, and establishing service levels and remedies. Because requirements and conditions may change, any service being used should be under the control of a written contract to protect the agency.

In December 2012 the Commonwealth Information Security Council published a white paper describing cloud computing and the security controls to be considered when evaluating the use of cloud computing services (see the Resource Links tab). As noted in the paper,

“Certain steps must be taken to ensure the appropriate level of security is used, depending on the sensitivity and classification of the agency data. More controls will be required if the data has been classified as sensitive than if it is considered public information. Once the data classification has been completed, the System Owner must determine how best to safeguard the information through the use of physical and logical access controls. Systems containing sensitive data should include the highest level of appropriate controls based on the confidentiality and integrity of the data. If the system includes data that is sensitive with respect to confidentiality, the agency should strongly consider not using a cloud computing service other than a Commonwealth provided service.”

Actionable Steps

  • CCS.A - Review and, where appropriate, implement the recommendations contained in the May 2016 Customer Advisory Report (COV): Cloud Vision and Strategy.

  • CCS.B - Develop the governance and security controls that enable agencies to use software as a service (SAAS) where appropriate.

  • CCS.C - Integrate cloud computing and the “traditional” infrastructure to provide a range of hosting options.

Agency Examples

VITA - Snap and Clone Technology

To ensure continuity of business operations following a data loss, VITA is offering point-in-time data duplication, or snap and clone technology. Snap and clone technology provides state agencies the ability to protect applications and server data through replication or cloning. Details of the service can be found at:
VITA FS - Snap and Clone Technology

VITA - Hosted Mail Archiving

Hosted mail archiving is an example of a current cloud service made possible because of the IT infrastructure operated by Northrop Grumman for the Commonwealth with oversight by VITA. Details of the service can be found at:
VITA FS - Hosted Mail Archiving

VGIN - Geospatial (GIS) Services

The Virginia Geographic Information Network (VGIN) Geospatial (GIS) Services provides a Geospatial Data Catalogue for public access service and state/local government data documentation service. Public services include open, one-stop internet access to a catalogue of all state agency geospatial data layers. Documentation includes information on the data's spatial extent, scale, format, content, currency, and accessibility. Services available to state agencies and local governments include secure, user-friendly access to an internet data documentation tool and clearinghouse. Further information can be found at:
VGIN - Geospatial (GIS) Services

Department of Transportation - Smart Scale Process

Virginia’s SMART SCALE (§33.2-21.4) is about picking the right transportation projects for funding and ensuring the best use of limited tax dollars. It is the method of scoring planned projects included in VTrans that are funded by HB 1887. Transportation projects are scored based on an objective, outcome-based process that is transparent to the public and allows decision-makers to be held accountable to taxpayers. Once projects are scored and prioritized, the Commonwealth Transportation Board (CTB) has the best information possible to select the right projects for funding. With approval, the application supporting this process is hosted via MS Azure cloud services. Further information can be found at: http://vasmartscale.com/

Resources

Cloud Computing: Security Considerations and Recommendations for Agencies

This December 2012 white paper from the Commonwealth Information Security Council describes cloud computing and examines the security controls to be considered when evaluating the use of cloud computing services. CSC - WP

NASCIO “Capitals in the Clouds” Publications

The National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) has published a series of reports on the use of cloud computing by state governments.

  • The Case for Cloud Computing in State Government Part I: Definitions and Principles

  • The Case for Cloud Computing in State Government Part II: Challenges and Opportunities to Get Your Data Right

  • Capitals in the Clouds Part III – Recommendations for Mitigating Risks: Jurisdictional, Contracting and Service Levels

  • Capitals in the Clouds Part IV – Cloud Security: On Mission and Means

  • Capitals in the Clouds Part V: Advice from the Trenches on Managing the Risk of Free File Sharing Cloud Services

The reports can be downloaded from the NASCIO publications site: http://www.nascio.org/publications/

Cloud First Buyers Guide for Government

To spur federal government agencies to take advantage of the benefits that cloud computing enables, the Obama administration has issued a Cloud First policy. This buyer’s guide is designed to assist government agencies as they evaluate and purchase cloud services and solutions in response to that policy.

The Guide, which includes case studies and “Myths & Realities”, is available at: Cloud Buyers Guide

FedRAMP.gov

“The Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program, or FedRAMP, is a government-wide program that provides a standardized approach to security assessment, authorization, and continuous monitoring for cloud products and services.” FedRAMP works to provide efficient cloud solutions that save agencies the time, employee base, and economic investment needed to implement cloud technologies.

The website, which provides comprehensive informational tabs, can be found here: https://www.fedramp.gov/about/

Technology trend: Enterprise Services (ES)

Commonwealth Goal

Continue to support and, where appropriate, extend the model of enterprise services to bring flexible, scalable, compatible technology to improve efficiency and effectiveness in Commonwealth operations.

Why This Trend

While this technology trend is fostering a new generation of services, agencies have participated in enterprise services for several years through the Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA).

VITA is establishing architecture and integration services with the goal of providing expertise and infrastructure to agencies to optimize digital government applications.

New enterprise services are important tools for facilitating agency business needs while managing the impacts of ongoing technology costs. The more agencies that use a service, the greater the cost savings.

Overview

Enterprise Services is a delivery model in which a physical or virtual enterprise center (supported by dedicated people, processes, and technologies) acts as a centralized provider of a defined business function for use by multiple enterprise constituencies.

Enterprise services are especially useful where 1) data analytics in business are used across departmental boundaries, 2) a shared service is more cost-effective, or 3) the service facilitates the transfer of information or worker knowledge.

As the designated provider of information technology services for executive branch agencies, VITA’s infrastructure offerings include computing and telecommunication services targeted to enable government to better serve Virginia's citizens. In an effort to simplify the service offerings, they are grouped into “custom infrastructure services” and “bundled infrastructure services.” The custom services are inclusive of the individual computing services required to process customer applications. The bundled services are inclusive of hardware, software, maintenance, and support.

Custom infrastructure services include servers (enterprise print, mainframe, virtual server, Windows server, SAN/DASD storage), disaster recovery (Unix servers, allocated storage, Windows, and other OS servers), network and telecommunications services, internet services, and domain name services. Bundled infrastructure services include desktops, laptops, and tablets as well as network attached printers, copiers, and incremental peripherals.

In addition to IT infrastructure services, VITA offers several enterprise services for agencies, such as Hosted Mail Archiving, Point-in-time Data Duplication, Enterprise Handheld Services, Unified Communications as a Service (UCaaS), and Geospatial (GIS) Services.

In 2012 the Electronic Health and Human Resources (eHHR) Program Office was formed under Secretary of Health and Human Resources Dr. William A. Hazel, Jr. While the primary purpose of the eHHR Program was to align the Commonwealth with federal health care initiatives and health care reform in the Commonwealth, a significant niche of the eHHR program was to leverage federal funding to establish robust, useful enterprise services for all state agencies. Among the enterprise services established were the Service Oriented Architecture Platform (SOA) and Enterprise Data Management. The purpose of the SOA was to procure, install, maintain, and configure an infrastructure to support an SOA model for providing multi-agency shared services. Enterprise Data Management tools provided a single, unified, and trusted view of data entities for any user or application.

Key Business Drivers

Several business drivers have been identified whose presence merits designating a service as an enterprise service. Among these drivers are the following:

  • Where services support business functions and data that cross agency boundaries

  • Where a shared service is more cost-effective

  • Where the shared service facilitates the transfer of information or worker knowledge

  • Where consistency in service quality is required

  • Where a shared service is foundational to other needed shared services

  • Where a common approach is recommended by best practices

For Virginia, health care reform has proved a significant driver for adoption of enterprise shared services. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act presented significant funding opportunities to improve the quality, accessibility, and value of Virginia healthcare, while establishing technical foundations for the future transformation of Virginia government services beyond healthcare. Specific to the ESS technology trend, federal funding enables the Commonwealth to achieve the following outcomes:

  • Modernize information technology infrastructure as an enabler for future business transformation.

  • Provide a technical environment where standards-based interoperability is possible between new and legacy systems.

  • Provide web-based, self-directed options for citizen services.

  • Maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of administrative and operational staff.

  • Manage overall long-term technology costs.

Support for Technology Business Plan Initiatives

  • Initiative 1 - Citizen access
    Enterprise services expands the technology options available to agencies for communicating with citizens.

  • Initiative 2 - Information sharing
    Enterprise shared services enables cost-effective sharing of information between agencies.

  • Initiative 3 - Workforce productivity
    By supporting an up-to-date technology and information infrastructure, enterprise shared services helps attract and retain younger workers.

  • Initiative 4 - Support for education
    Educational services, such as Blackboard, are already supporting the Commonwealth’s educational initiatives.

  • Initiative 5 - Expansion of technology platforms/tools
    Enterprise shared services is a key element for improving worker productivity by providing access to shared information.

  • Initiative 6 - IT and cyber security
    Enterprise services provide an opportunity to implement a high level of security across a wide range of users.

  • Initiative 7 - Enterprise and collaborative services
    Enterprise services (ESS) should be used to promote collaborative analyses of various datasets. ESS also should be developed to reduce the occurrence of data redundancies.

Challenges

The implementation of new services such as SOA present technical, security, and organization challenges. The development of these services necessitates mastering new technologies and platforms, as well as addressing new security issues. The involvement of multiple agencies within ESS results in increased levels of project and program management. Concurrent with the implementation of new services, the Commonwealth must establish policy and processes to govern agency use of enterprise or collaborative shared solutions, as well as address lingering concerns about the shared services approach. Lastly, there will be demand in the near future for shared services that address asset management.

Actionable Steps

  • ES.A - Expand use of central integration and collaboration services to enable better standardized exchange of information between agencies and partners.

  • ES.B - Promote awareness of VITA Enterprise Cloud Oversight Service (ECOS), which is required for all externally hosted solutions or platforms.

  • ES.C - Promote awareness and use of the eGov web development and hosting services contracts.

  • ES.D - Offer Commonwealth-wide instructional software, such as course management and collaboration tools.

Agency Examples

VITA - Workplace Collaboration Service

Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA) offers Workplace Collaboration Services (WCS) featuring Microsoft SharePoint 2013, a Web-based project collaboration system that provides a single integrated location where employees can efficiently collaborate, find organizational resources, manage content and workflows, and leverage business insight to make better informed decisions. This service includes disaster recovery (DR) services for the production environment at the tier 6 level. The service is available to any customer receiving standard COV messaging services through VITA’s IT Infrastructure program. Further information can be found at: Catalog Services

DSS - EDSP Program

The Department of Social Services (DSS) Enterprise Delivery System Program (EDSP) represents the following major projects:

  1. The Eligibility Modernization Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI). This is a single Medicaid case management system for MAGI Medicaid and CHIP/FAMIS categories.

  2. The Migration Project consists of ADAPT and the Energy system replacement, as well as the inclusion of the final Medicaid category of ABD/LTC. The Migration project leverages an external rules engine (IBM WODM) and other VITA SOA components as well as document management and imaging that includes centralized printing and mailing services.

  3. The Eligibility Modernization Conversion project converts data for Families and Children’s Medicaid, CHIP, and FAMIS systems into the VaCMS.

The EDSP program represents the continued efforts to implement the Department’s and HHR Secretariat IT Strategic Plan vision of a self-service benefits and services model that is efficient, effective, and provides a customer-friendly experience. The EDSP promotes a business process model and information technology that is enterprise-wide, interoperable, secure, and expandable across HHR departments in the Commonwealth.

For further information, contact Robert Hobbelman, Chief Information Officer, Division of Information Systems, Virginia Department of Social Services

DMME: Multi Agency Collaboration - Solar Energy Projects

The Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy (DMME) has started a project that aims to identify and characterize sites for solar energy projects on various state agency facilities. The solar energy projects will offer a significant return on investment to those agencies willing to adopt the technology. So far, collaborating agencies include DMME as the frontrunner, along with the Departments of Forestry, Corrections, and General Services, and the Virginia Economic Development Partnership. Visit the link for more information on the completion process: http://maps.cise.jmu.edu/public/wind/CEDSmap/index.html

Virginia Information Technologies Agency - Microsoft Dynamics

The Virginia Information Technologies Agency (VITA) offers Workplace Productivity Solutions (WPS) featuring Microsoft Dynamics Customer Relationship Management 2011 (CRM), a collection of technology tools that enable agency staff to support relationships and activities with customers of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Visit the link below to learn more about the basic and customizable options available. 

Commonwealth Agencies - Cardinal

The Cardinal System provides the Commonwealth with a modern ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) financial management system. Cardinal is not limited exclusively to financial business processes but might one day be expanded to include other administrative functions. For more information, visit the Cardinal home page: http://www.cardinalproject.virginia.gov/

Resources

Virginia Information Technologies Agency Services

The list of current VITA services can be found at: Technology Services

Virginia Information Technologies Agency Architecture and Integration Services

Originally established to develop and support the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), on August 3, 2016 VITA announced the service will be restructured with the goal of providing expertise and infrastructure to agencies to optimize digital government applications.

Actionable Steps Supporting Commonwealth Technology Business Plan Initiatives

The “Actionable Steps” tab in each “Technology Trend” page identifies the actionable steps that derive from the technology trend. This page lists the actionable steps that align with and support each of the seven Commonwealth Technology Business Plan initiatives.

The letters in front of each strategic direction identify the associated technology trend using the following codes:

  • ITISP – IT Infrastructure Services Program

  • SDA – Shared Data and Analytics

  • ISRM – Information Security and Risk Management

  • EIADG – Enterprise Information Architecture and Data Governance

  • CCS – Cloud Computing Services

  • DG – Digital Government / Internet of Things

  • ES – Enterprise Services

The 33 actionable steps are listed in the table below. The first column provides an identifier for each actionable step, based in part on the technology trend code noted above. The second column lists the actionable steps. The remaining seven columns represent the seven initiatives from the Commonwealth Technology Business Plan (Iisted below). Alignment of an actionable step to an initiative from the Commonwealth Technology Business Plan is indicated by an “X.”

Commonwealth Technology Business Plan Initiatives

  • Initiative 1 - Emphasize programs and tools that enable all citizens to interact with government safely and securely, and when, how, and where they want to interact.

  • Initiative 2 - Improve information-sharing and governance to derive quality information from data already collected.

  • Initiative 3 - Leverage technology to improve worker productivity and make state employment more attractive to the current and future workforce.

  • Initiative 4 - Support educational attainment initiatives—key to achieving state economic development and quality of life goals.

  • Initiative 5 - Expand technology platforms and productivity tools that support Virginia’s goal of remaining the best managed state.

  • Initiative 6 - Support initiatives that will make Virginia the leader in IT security and cyber security.

  • Initiative 7 - Expand and support enterprise and collaborative IT services.

Alignment of Actionable Steps to Commonwealth Technology Business Plan Initiatives
  Initiatives
IDActionable Step1234567
ITISP.A Build multi-supplier model, including a services integrator.     X   X    
ITISP.B Work with Customer Advisory Council (CAC) to enhance agency involvement in future services delivery platform.     X       X
ITISP.C Determine agency and VITA organizational adjustments to support new service delivery model.     X        
ITISP.D Conduct three waves of competitive procurements.     X   X    
ITISP.E VITA, in conjunction with agencies, will prepare and lead all tasks needed to implement the IT Infrastructure Services Program.     X        
ITISP.F Work with the Customer Advisory Council to implement the approved Commonwealth IT Infrastructure Management and Governance (CIIMG) charter.     X       X
SDA.A Identify and modify Code of Virginia language that prohibits sharing of data between agencies.   X          
SDA.B Promote the COV open data portal “data.virginia.gov” and continue to grow the number of open datasets on the website. X X     X    
SDA.C

Develop an enterprise approach to using “big data” and analytical tools that:

  • Identifies commonwealth, agency, and partner business needs that can be efficiently and effectively addressed by applying innovative forms of IT and analysis to appropriate enterprise data.

  • Defines and implements applications incorporating the necessary advanced IT and analytical capabilities.

  X     X    
SDA.D Implement information sharing policies, standards, and guidelines (PSGs) and a data sharing framework for acceptable use of publishing public datasets. X X          
SDA.E Establish a trust agreement framework, defined by PSGs, to support Commonwealth-wide information exchange across domains and levels of government.   X         X
SDA.F Develop an enterprise approach to data management to enable the effective governance of information assets aligned with industry trends, including big data, business analytics, and emerging toolsets.   X X   X   X
SDA.G Support the integration of emerging workforce skills needs and course learning objectives databases statewide to better match educational opportunities to occupational titles.       X      
ISRM.A Manage the IT Risk Management program for the Commonwealth, including implementation of a risk management portfolio tool.   X       X  
ISRM.B Enhance the Commonwealth's cyber security posture. X         X  
ISRM.C

Continue to enhance the cyber security governance framework to include:

  • Implementation of a method framework to ensure compliance with security PSGs.

  • Monitoring of Commonwealth data and assets for threats and vulnerabilities and remediation of any issues identified.

  • Identification, mitigation, and management of IT security incidents.

  • Development of cyber intelligence based on research of current cyber trends as well as analysis of cyber data within the Commonwealth.

  • Provision of cyber security data and information to Commonwealth entities and other partners of the Commonwealth.

  X       X  
ISRM.D Develop security governance requirements for Commonwealth identity management. X X       X  
ISRM.E Provide adequate cyber security training and education for Commonwealth leaders, IT professionals, information security personnel, and Commonwealth employees.     X     X  
DG.A Develop and implement policies and technologies to enable a mobile environment that is both attractive to next-generation workers and cost effective and productive for the Commonwealth.     X   X    
DG.B Establish a standard for mobile apps development (including a security component) and a list of targeted applications. X   X   X X  
DG.C Establish a forum for early adopters to share plans and experiences with collecting and processing internet of things (IoT) data.     X        
DG.D Ensure agency involvement in processes to periodically assess new and emerging technologies.     X   X    
DG.E Increase investment in internet bandwidth to meet forecasted growth in internet based services.   X X   X   X
EIADG.A Maintain and refine an enterprise information architecture strategy.   X X   X    
EIADG.B Adopt and implement information exchange standards to provide a common basis for governmental information sharing.   X X   X   X
EIADG.C Continue to define the roles and responsibilities of the Commonwealth of Virginia data stewards and the governance stewardship body.     X        
CCS.A Review and, where appropriate, implement the recommendations contained in the May 2016 Customer Advisory Report (COV): Cloud Vision and Strategy. X X X   X   X
CCS.B Develop the governance and security controls that enable agencies to use software as a service (SAAS) where appropriate.     X   X X  
CCS.C Integrate cloud computing and the “traditional” infrastructure to provide a range of hosting options.     X   X   X
ES.A Expand use of central integration and collaboration services to enable better standardized exchange of information between agencies and partners.   X X   X    
ES.B Promote awareness of VITA Enterprise Cloud Oversight Service (ECOS), which is required for all externally hosted solutions or platforms. X   X   X X X
ES.C Promote awareness and use of the eGov web development and hosting services contracts. X   X   X   X
ES.D Offer Commonwealth-wide instructional software, such as course management and collaboration tools.     X X     X

Statutory Authority

Section 2.2-2007 of the Code of Virginia requires the Commonwealth Chief Information Officer (CIO) to "develop a comprehensive six-year commonwealth strategic plan for information technology". The complete Code citation is as follows:

Section 2.2-2007 of the Code of Virginia - Powers of the CIO

  1. In addition to such other duties as the Secretary may assign, the CIO shall:

    1. Monitor trends and advances in information technology; develop a comprehensive six-year commonwealth strategic plan for information technology to include:

      1. specific projects that implement the plan;

      2. a plan for the acquisition, management, and use of information technology by state agencies;

      3. a report of the progress of any ongoing enterprise information technology projects, any factors or risks that might affect their successful completion, and any changes to their projected implementation costs and schedules; and

      4. a report on the progress made by state agencies toward accomplishing the commonwealth strategic plan for information technology. The Commonwealth strategic plan for information technology shall be updated annually and submitted to the Secretary for approval.

The The CY 2017 Update to the Commonwealth of Virginia Strategic Plan for Information Technology for 2017 - 2022 is one component of a system of information technology governance put in place to meet the requirements of Section 2.2-2007 and related Code sections. Information technology governance is implemented through the following policy and standards:

The complete list of Information Technology Resource Management (ITRM) policies, standards, and guidelines can be found on the Virginia Information Technologies Agency website at: ITRM Policies, Standards & Guidelines

Appendices

Appendix A: Software at Risk - Key Applications

The spreadsheet below identifies 78 key applications that VITA Enterprise Architecture determined are at risk due to being at or near the end of their lifecycle. The determination is based on information contained in the Commonwealth Enterprise Technology Repository (CETR). CETR consists of agency inventories of applications, data assets, and software tools. Applications are included where the preponderance of information suggests the application is at risk, or will be soon enough to merit inclusion, or the lack of sufficient information raised concerns. It should be noted that in some cases information has not been entered in CETR, which is reflected in the spreadsheet as empty cells.

Note: This appendix is outdated and is for historical reference only.
ITSP: Appendix A: Software at Risk - Key Applications (xlsx)

Appendix B: Software at Risk - Key Operating and Database Management Systems

The spreadsheet below identifies 17 key operating and database management systems that VITA Enterprise Architecture determined are at risk due to being at or near the end of their lifecycle. The determination is based on information contained in the Commonwealth Enterprise Technology Repository (CETR). CETR consists of agency inventories of applications, data assets, and software tools. Systems are included where the preponderance of information suggests the system is at risk, or will be soon enough to merit inclusion, or the lack of sufficient information raised concerns. It should be noted that in some cases information has not been entered in CETR, which is reflected in the spreadsheet by empty cells.

Note: This appendix is outdated and is for historical reference only.
ITSP: Appendix B: Software at Risk-Key Operating and Database Management System (xlsx)